PCR

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A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction

DNA PCR Hot start PCR Mammalian DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Methylation specific PCR Bacterial DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Methylation specific PCR Mammalian DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality hot-start DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction

DNA PCR Hot start PCR Bacterial DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. A quantitative, real-time PCR reaction typically includes all of that plus a probe that can be detected fluorescently as the reaction runs, with no gel required. for detection. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Conventional / Qualitative PCR mammalian DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. A quantitative, real-time PCR reaction typically includes all of that plus a probe that can be detected fluorescently as the reaction runs, with no gel required. for detection. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Conventional / Qualitative PCR bacterial DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. A quantitative, real-time PCR reaction typically includes all of that plus a probe that can be detected fluorescently as the reaction runs, with no gel required. for detection. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Quantitative real-time PCR Bacterial DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. A quantitative, real-time PCR reaction typically includes all of that plus a probe that can be detected fluorescently as the reaction runs, with no gel required. for detection. However, non-specific product amplification and primer-dimer formation during set-up are major causes of PCR failure. Nevertheless, high-quality DNA polymerase and optimize reaction buffers will certainly lead to a successful PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Quantitative real-time PCR Mammalian DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. Multiplexing such a reaction amplifies the design challenges where one target requires 3 primers, which should be exclusively bound nowhere in the template DNA or to each other. Similarly, two targets require 6, three require 9, and so on. Each amplicon needs to be either a different size (for gels) or labeled with a different fluorescent tag that is spectrally distinct from the others in the reaction. Further complicating this, different targets in the reaction can compete with each other for resources and causes more challenges in the detection of amplicons. However, with proper primer designing, their validation, optimize quality and concentration of the enzyme and buffers certainly lead to a successful multiplex PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Multiplex PCR Bacterial DNA

A PCR reaction consists of the template DNA, two primers covering the amplification site, an enzyme, and buffers. Multiplexing such a reaction amplifies the design challenges where one target requires 3 primers, which should be exclusively bound nowhere in the template DNA or to each other. Similarly, two targets require 6, three require 9, and so on. Each amplicon needs to be either a different size (for gels) or labeled with a different fluorescent tag that is spectrally distinct from the others in the reaction. Further complicating this, different targets in the reaction can compete with each other for resources and causes more challenges in the detection of amplicons. However, with proper primer designing, their validation, optimize quality and concentration of the enzyme and buffers certainly lead to a successful multiplex PCR reaction.

DNA PCR Multiplex PCR Mammalian DNA
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